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Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases for example, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV).

Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a new strain that was discovered in 2019 and has not been previously identified in humans and that can affect your lungs and airways.

The COVID-19 viral disease is officially a pandemic, announced by the World Health Organization on Wednesday 11th March 2020.  It has started in Wu Han of China in December 2019 and spread into at least 196 countries with over 400,000 cases and killed more than 20000 people in a few months.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source, COVID-19 is highly contagious, which means it spreads easily from person to person. The incubation period for the novel coronavirus is between 2 to 14 days after exposure. It spreads mostly from person to person through close contact or from droplets that are scattered when a person with the virus sneezes or coughs. People who have the virus are most contagious when they’re showing symptoms. Coronavirus is airborne virus which means that it is mainly ransmitted through air by both small dry particles and as well as larger liquid droplets.

It is possible that someone with the coronavirus infection without showing symptoms can transmit the virus, though it is less common. Also there is a possibility that the virus can be transmitted via touching virus-contaminated surfaces and then touching your mouth or nose, though it is not main way of spreading.

COVID-19 symptoms start as mild symptoms and gradually get worse over a few days for many people. The main symptoms include fever, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue. Other symptoms are achiness, nasal congestion, sore throat and running nose.

What to do?

Follow Government rules and seek advice from NHS helpline

Self- isolation

Use the 111 coronavirus service, if

you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home

your condition gets worse

your symptoms do not get better after 7 days

Should you do acupuncture, if you have COVID-19?

No. You shouldn’t do acupuncture, if you have symptoms of COVID-19. Acupuncture can’t kill COVID-19, but there is a possibility of increasing the spreading of the virus due to its high contagion nature. In China, acupuncture is not used to treat COVID-19.

Wishing everyone stay safe and well.

References

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-pandemic-who.html

https://www.healthline.com/health/coronavirus-incubation-period#how-does-it-spread

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Research shows that diabetes is a risk factor for the progression and prognosis of COVID-19.

COVID-19 is a novel virus which has lots of unknown factors. Is diabetes a risk factor affecting the progression and prognosis of COVID-19? A total of 174 consecutive patients confirmed with COVID-19 were studied. They found that patients with diabetes were at higher risk of severe pneumonia, release of tissue injury-related enzymes, excessive uncontrolled inflammation responses and hypercoagulable state associated with dysregulation of glucose metabolism. Moreover, serum levels of inflammation related biomarkers such as IL-6, C-reactive protein, serum ferritine and coagulation index, D-dimer, were significantly higher in diabetic patients compared with those without. This suggests that patients with diabetes are more susceptible to an inflammatory storm eventually leading to rapid deterioration of COVID-19. The conclusion is that diabetes should be considered as a risk factor for a rapid progression and bad prognosis of COVID-19.

References

Guo W Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2020 Mar 31:e3319. doi: 10.1002/dmrr.3319. [Epub ahead of print]

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